Solid Example of “Infotainment”

A few months ago, I saw a great ad on YouTube.

It was from a menswear retailer named Peter Christian.

Here’s a link to the video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ncdn11Pxnhk

(This ad might seem rather strange if you’re not from the UK. Henry Blofeld, “Blowers”, is a celebrated cricket commentator and broadcaster – known for his eccentric style, in dressing and speaking, and his remarks about pigeons.)

I can’t remember what I was watching at the time, but this short tutorial on how to tie a bow tie appeared between videos – as a paid ad – and, from a combination of intrigue and amusement, I just couldn’t hit the “skip ad” button like I normally would.

This was a good ad. You don’t often see good ads on YouTube. Especially not from clothing retailers. So I subscribed to their email list to see what I might learn.

We make it a habit to follow any business that demonstrates strong relationship marketing, even if it operates in an industry with which we have no involvement.

Why?

Because you might be surprised at how – with a bit of creativity – some of the strategies, tactics, and ideas we stumble upon from time to time can be applied in other industries that, on the surface, seem to be very different.

Over the last three months, I’ve been receiving emails from Peter Christian and paying close attention to them.

Unfortunately, they’re nowhere near as good as their YouTube ads.

First up, they send emails far too infrequently. Since subscribing in December, I have received just two emails: one at the beginning of January; and one at the beginning of February. (It looks like their email marketing guy took some time off in March.)

If I owned a clothing retailer and I wanted to stay in business, I’d be emailing at least twice per week – and I’d been sending even more to the “hyper-responsives”.

Second, their emails contain only “thin” content. In this case, it looks like each of their monthly emails is one specific outfit from their lookbook. There are a couple of annotated photographs, and links to the featured products.

So – what would I do instead?

I’d hand their email marketing to the team that created the Henry Blofeld video above.

Because they clearly understand the concept of “infotainment”.

If they could take the essence of that video, put it into an email, and send something like that out several times per week, I’m confident they’ll see an increase in sales.

Even better, they would see an increase in customer lifetime value, which means they would be able to invest more in YouTube ads and still recoup a higher profit from new customers they acquire. This would help them build a “moat” around their brand.

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